INETA's David Yack on ADO.NET and My REST Talk at SoCal Architecture Group.

Tomorrow, July 16th, David Yack will be speaking on Exploring the Entity Framework at SGV.NET User Group (www.sgvdotnet.org). It's an INETA sponsored event and for those interested in understanding a core strategic part of Microsoft's data access strategy, please join us. David would walks us through how Entity Framework aims to improve the  mismatch between data storage and data usage by applications.  In his talk he will explore the Entity Data Model and the various techniques for accessing using the client libraries that are part of the Entity Framework.  With V1 of Entity Framework almost ready to go out the door, David will also touch on efforts already underway for V2.

Speaking of Speaking, On Thursday July 17th, I'll be presenting to SoCal.NET architecture group (http://www.socaldotnetarchitecture.org/) on "RESTFul Web Services – UriTemplates and REST support with WCF 3.5". The abstract of the talk as follows.

"REST (Representational state transfer) is an architectural style to build distributed systems in a Uri centric way focusing on resource addressing via HTTP style "command line" interface. REST style of service development improves server scalability, allows systems to be more robust and promotes long-term compatibility and evolvability. Related technologies using the similar design principles are  ASP.NET MVC and  ADO.NET data services (Astoria). Support for REST is introduced in WCF 3.5 with a new WCF binding (webHttpBinding) allowing .NET developers to have the option of build light weight REST style services in contrast with traditional SOAP/RPC style development.

The presentation focuses on REST design principles and how they can be implemented using Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) 3.5. New Features such as support for UriTemplates, Web HTTP binding, syndication support and the new web programming model leveraging a RESTful design of web services within the unified WCF programming model will be addressed for architectural and implementation perspective."

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